Engage Viewers With A Living Room Photo By Doing This - Interior Design

 Pretty normal entrance living room

Pretty normal entrance living room

Looking at the image to the left (or above in mobile mode) is something a real estate photographer might deliver. It's not great but it shows what the house looks like, but it's just a picture and something people will simply swipe away.

The challenge is to create something that means something to viewers, to create a connection and make them want to swipe back for a second, third or fourth look.

Let's look at the other side...

 This other side of the living room looks much better

This other side of the living room looks much better

This other side of the living room looks much better, but see what happens when you go too wide? The chairs look warped and much longer than it actually is because of "volume anamorphic" or wide angle distortion. Again, there's no feeling to the image and it doesn't grab attention.

Times have changed and viewers are so used to seeing photos now that past tricks can't fool them anymore.

I had 30 minutes to spare, so I took upon this challenge to create something meaningful, something viewers could possibly imagine themselves in. Creating this form of engagement is the key to a successful photograph.

 

 Step One: Get closer and find a composition

Step One: Get closer and find a composition

First step is to get closer and find a composition that works and I started off with this.

To me it feels really cramped and there's no where for the eyes to move, kinda like being trapped in a corner and truth, the floor lamp has become the centre of attention, so lets find a similar but a more open composition.

 
 Much more open space for the viewer's eyes!

Much more open space for the viewer's eyes!

Ahhh more open space for the viewer's eyes! Still feels a little cramp in terms of height but I am pretty much set on the angle. 

 
 Try going vertical

Try going vertical

I flipped my camera 90 degrees knowing that I'd chop off 1/2 the couch, but we all know what the other side of the couch would look like (or close enough), so that's fine. Oh and by the way, it was a very cloudy and gloomy day, but there's still directional light coming from the left window "kissing" the couch and pillow, so time for a boost!

 
 Boosting the window light

Boosting the window light

Boosting the window light has done some wonders, but it looks so unnatural, but let's fix that later.

The other thing to look at is the shadow part, it is like a black hole and in person I can see the fabric detail in there. Don't be afraid of shadows though, as shadows, if used strategically, creates three dimensionality and gives the image character.

 
 Lighten up the shadow area

Lighten up the shadow area

I lightened up the shadow area but it's a bit of an overkill I know because I basically killed all shadows and now it looks really unnatural.

 Balance the natural light with artificial lights

Balance the natural light with artificial lights

Almost complete and the final stage is to get everything right. Here, I balance the natural light with artificial lights by toning down the artificial lights and clearing up any loose ends, such as the lamp power cord and the usb charger.

 
Living Room Final - Adrian Tan Photography - Perth Architectural, Interior Design, High End Real Estate Photographer

Here's the final image, showcasing the tiles, timber flooring, the design aspect, as a viewer, I can really imagine myself on a warm afternoon relaxing on this couch with a book, phone or laptop.

Would you agree with me?